measure


measure
I. measure mea‧sure 1 [ˈmeʒə ǁ -ər] noun
1. [countable] an official action, taken to deal with a particular problem:

• The company has had to take cost-cutting measures, including reducing spending on certain marketing programs.

ausˈterity ˌmeasure [countable usually plural]
an official action taken by a government in order to reduce the amount of money that it spends or the amount that people spend:

• The government introduced austerity measures including a freeze on public sector pay.

2. a measure of something a way of measuring or calculating something:

• Gross domestic product is the Commerce Department's main measure of U.S. economic output.

• Car sales are often seen as a measure of consumer confidence.

3. [countable, uncountable] an amount or unit in a measuring system:

• a table of weights and measures

ˌdry ˈmeasure [countable, uncountable]
a system of units for measuring goods such as grain and sugar that are not liquids, or one of these units
ˌliquid ˈmeasure [countable, uncountable]
a system of units for measuring liquids, or one of these units
  [m0] II. measure measure 2 verb [transitive]
to find out or calculate the amount or level of something:

• ways to measure and improve service quality

• This country has the third highest standard of living, as measured by per capita GDP.

measure something against something

• All currencies have historically been measured against gold.

measure something in something

• Overseas sales, measured in dollars, rose 18% last year.

measure up phrasal verb [intransitive]
to be good enough, or as good as expected:

• None of the products measured up.

measure up to

• Their performance in recent years hasn't measured up to their longer-term record.

* * *

Ⅰ.
measure UK US /ˈmeʒər/ verb
[I or T] to discover the exact size or amount of something: »

Next, we need to measure the temperature of the mixture.

»

This machine measures the patient's heart rate.

measure sth in sth »

November was a record number for sales when measured in dollars.

»

measuring devices/equipment/techniques

[T] to be of a particular size: »

The office measures 12 metres by 6 metres.

[T] to judge the quality, effect, importance, or value of something: »

It is difficult to measure the success of the advertising campaign at this early stage.

»

Managers have changed the way they measure performance.

Ⅱ.
measure UK US /ˈmeʒər/ noun
[C, usually plural] a way of achieving something, or a method for dealing with a situation: »

These measures were designed to improve car safety.

»

We will introduce measures to reduce noise levels in the factory.

»

The company will need to take further measures to cut costs.

austerity/cost-cutting measures »

It had taken a series of cost-cutting measures, including closing one of its two plants.

»

drastic/draconian/radical measures

»

preventative/safety/security measures

[C] MEASURES a unit used for giving the size, weight, etc. of something: »

weights and measures

»

The standard measure of efficiency in the airline industry is 'cost per passenger mile'.

[C or U] an amount or level of something: »

There was a large measure of agreement between the two sides in the negotiation.

[C] a way of judging something: »

Record sales are not always a measure of a singer's popularity.

get a measure of sth »

It is difficult to get an accurate measure of employee performance in this industry.

a good/true/reliable measure »

Exports as a percentage of total sales are a good measure of international competitiveness.

for good measure — Cf. for good measure
have the measure of sb/sth — Cf. have the measure of sth
See also COUNTERMEASURE(Cf. ↑countermeasure), DRY MEASURE(Cf. ↑dry measure), MADE-TO-MEASURE(Cf. ↑made-to-measure)

Financial and business terms. 2012.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • measure — meas ure (m[e^]zh [ u]r; 135), n. [OE. mesure, F. mesure, L. mensura, fr. metiri, mensus, to measure; akin to metrum poetical measure, Gr. me tron, E. meter. Cf. {Immense}, {Mensuration}, {Mete} to measure.] 1. A standard of dimension; a fixed… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • measure — [mezh′ər] n. [ME mesure < OFr < L mensura < mensus, pp. of metiri, to measure < IE base * mē , to measure > MEAL1, Sans mātrā, a measure, Gr metron] 1. the extent, dimensions, capacity, etc. of anything, esp. as determined by a… …   English World dictionary

  • Measure K — is an ordinance put on the city of Santa Cruz s annual ballot on November 6, 2006. It s purpose was to give marijuana violations the lowest priority for local law enforcement. All other offenses besides adult marijuana offenses were put to a… …   Wikipedia

  • Measure — Meas ure, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Measured}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Measuring}.] [F. mesurer, L. mensurare. See {Measure}, n.] 1. To ascertain by use of a measuring instrument; to compute or ascertain the extent, quantity, dimensions, or capacity of, by a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • measure — ► VERB 1) determine the size, amount, or degree of (something) by comparison with a standard unit. 2) be of (a specified size). 3) (measure out) take an exact quantity of. 4) (measure up) reach the required or expected standard. ► NOUN 1) …   English terms dictionary

  • measure — I noun act, bill, caveat, declaration, decree, dictate, edict, enactment, law, legislation, legislative enactment, legislative mandate, legislative proclamation, mandate, piece of legislation, prescript, prescription, proposal, proposed act,… …   Law dictionary

  • measure — [n1] portion, scope admeasurement, admensuration, allotment, allowance, amount, amplification, amplitude, area, bang, breadth, bulk, capacity, degree, depth, dimension, distance, duration, extent, fix, frequency, height, hit, magnitude, mass,… …   New thesaurus

  • measure up to — measure up (to (someone/something)) to reach a standard that is as good as someone or something else. The math skills of the majority of children in this school measure up to the national standards. Usage notes: often used in a negative way: They …   New idioms dictionary

  • measure up — (to (someone/something)) to reach a standard that is as good as someone or something else. The math skills of the majority of children in this school measure up to the national standards. Usage notes: often used in a negative way: They didn t… …   New idioms dictionary

  • Measure — Meas ure, v. i. 1. To make a measurement or measurements. [1913 Webster] 2. To result, or turn out, on measuring; as, the grain measures well; the pieces measure unequally. [1913 Webster] 3. To be of a certain size or quantity, or to have a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • measure of — To be the (or a) standard by which to judge the quality, etc of ● measure …   Useful english dictionary